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  • [Corsa C 2000-2006] Corsa 1.0 twinport

    It's got 10 mot mot but I have no service history for it. I have bought a service kit from eBay to change the filters. Fuel filter looks brand new underneath. Air filter will be changed.
    It sounds like there's a humming noise coming from the air filter area when I'm driving


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  • #2
    When you start a new thread you need to say what the problem is - not everyone will spot this from the post on the other thread.

    But if you have no service history for it then begin with a full service. The problem you described could be as simple as old spark plugs.
    1972 Viva restoration thread - http://www.thecorsa.co.uk/projects-b....html#post1534

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    • #3
      Ok thanks.
      Have ordered the new plugs and filters.should I change them all as the fuel filter looks brand new?
      Any advice on the things I should check over or what I should be looking for? I'm pretty new to it all but ill give it my best shot
      Thanks


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      • #4
        If you don't know when they were last changed assume they need doing. At least with new plugs, oil and filters you know where you stand. Otherwise it's guesswork.

        It is possible someone replaced the fuel filter because the old one was blocked, without doing anything else. Don't just service the engine, check the brakes as well.
        1972 Viva restoration thread - http://www.thecorsa.co.uk/projects-b....html#post1534

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        • #5
          The air filter box screws are rusted on. Can remove the box but not get into the box to change the filter.
          Tried WD40, plus the screws are rounded off should I invest in a new box or buy some screw extractor bit.
          Any advice thanks

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          • #6
            Try some differing sizes of screwdriver bits/head first - if you have them.

            I have found with posidrive or philips, by using - as appropriate - a narrower or thicker bit/head, one can gain traction on the screw without camming it out further.

            another trick if the cams are damaged is to use a small flat bit screwdriver to get down into the screw and see if it will move it

            These should move relatively easily without much torque as they are only - as far as I recall - inserted only into plastic (I stand to be corrected) i.e. they are not rusted into female metal thread, which would be much more difficult to remove.

            If all comes to all, you could drill the centre of the screw with say 1 or 2 mm bit (careful not to snap the bit or you wont be able to drill THAT out as it is hardened) and attempt to extract with an extractor (careful not to snap these either - whereby as said should not be much torque required IF screwed into plastic)
            Last edited by zuluman; 15-07-2016, 12:27 PM.

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            • #7
              As zuluman says they probably tap into plastic.I have also had success with his tip of using a small flat screwdriver in just two of a pozidrive/philips cross head slots. Sometimes its a worn philips/pozidrive screwdriver or using the wrong one or size, that caused the problem with rounding in the first place. If this doesnt work, or they use a special head such as torx or allen key to following may work.

              If the heads are exposed you could try cutting a simple slot across the head using a hacksaw, file or a small dremel type cutting/grinding wheel and then use a flat screwdriver.
              If the heads are recessed it might be easier just to drill the heads off using a drill bit the same size as the head. You may be lucky and find enough of the stem of the screw is left exposed once the cover is removed to unscrew them using pliers/mole grips. They are easier to remove once they are no longer under tension from their head. If necessary you may need to drill the stems out as well and find an alternative way of fixing.Larger self tapping screws, using plastic wall plugs in the larger hole and tapping in to them, or drill right through and use nuts and bolts etc etc. If you damage the box beyond repair, tape/cable tie it together until you can source a replacement.

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