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  • [Corsa C 2000-2006] Battery Help Please

    My battery has died. Went to buy a new one today only to find the battery shop sells them but doesn't fit them. Not insured to fit batteries they said. Not happy so decided to go elsewhere that I know do fit batteries (on a Saturday the only one open in the afternoon was Halfords).

    Car had other ideas. In the few minutes I was in the battery shop, the battery had died completely. No option but to return to the shop and reluctantly buy one of their batteries to fit myself. That really went against the grain but needs must. Borrowed a spanner from them only to find that the Corsa isn't so straightforward as other cars I've fitted batteries to in the past. Ended up jump starting the old battery from the new one (I carry jump leads) which got the traitorous box on wheels going again so now the new battery is sitting in the passenger footwell.

    Can anyone tell me how to fit the new battery please?

    Mine is a year 2000 Corsa C, 1.2 engine and right now definitely NOT my favourite car. First time in 43 years of driving I've been left red-faced by a car

  • #2
    They're a ***** to get out. The "proper" way to do it is by removing the scuttle panel above the battery but you can get away with just tilting the battery towards you . At least if the plastic part is no longer there

    Click image for larger version

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    This might help

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    • #3
      Thanks for that Leestons. The plastic part is still there. Sometimes I wonder at the mentality of car designers when they put such a consumable item in an awkward place. I'll have a look at the YT video.

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      • #4
        The main thing is the order you do the connections, and to avoid crossing the terminals as the ecu will be damaged if you get them the wrong way round.

        Disconnect the earth (negative) first then the positive. Remove the old battery. Fit new battery and bolt it down. Then connect the positive first and the earth last. That way if at any stage when working on the positive terminal you accidentally bridge to the bodywork there is no circuit possible.
        1972 Viva restoration thread - http://www.thecorsa.co.uk/projects-b....html#post1534

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        • #5
          Thanks for the tips Taurus. Notice you have a Viva for your avatar. I had one of these back in the mid 70s. Mine was silver and the biggest pain in the ass I've ever had! The headlights were useless. Seen more light off candles on a birthday cake and it was forever breaking down. I only had it a few weeks when one morning I put my foot on the clutch, there was a kind of whirring noise, a bang and the pedal went straight to the ground. I managed to crash change the gearbox 15 miles into town. Always said that car was the devil's own. Still remember it's reg - GXB 666H. Spooky LOL. I got rid of it - fast.

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          • #6
            I seem to remember most cars were like that in the 1970's. And prone to turn into shredded wheat.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Bugman View Post
              I seem to remember most cars were like that in the 1970's. And prone to turn into shredded wheat.
              I had plenty of them. Hit a bump and another rusty piece fell off. I look back now and think "Did I REALLY drive that?" Yes. I did and it was a whole lot of fun. Never thought of the dangers of driving rustbuckets with little or no brakes. If it got from A to B and you were still in once piece, that was a minor miracle.

              Happy days

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              • #8
                And just to add another frustration, go to change the battery and find that the screws holding in the plastic are not flathead or phillips but some kind of star shaped screws and I don't have that type of screwdriver to remove them

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                • #9
                  That was when driving was an 'experience', nowadays we take it for granted that we will get to our destination.

                  By the way, if you are taking the scuttle off to access the battery, the easiest way to remove the wiper arms, is to first of all lift them clear of the screen so that there is no pressure across the hinge of the arm.

                  The days are long gone (if they ever existed) when car designers gave much thought to people who have to work on their product - all that matters to them, is saving a penny or two in construction.

                  Regards

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by LadyF View Post
                    And just to add another frustration, go to change the battery and find that the screws holding in the plastic are not flathead or phillips but some kind of star shaped screws and I don't have that type of screwdriver to remove them
                    You need a set of Torx bits - most half decent tool shops will sell them. I know it looks like they are just making life awkward but Torx bolts are actually much better than the older kind. As someone who regularly has to dismantle older cars you soon realise that not all progress is bad.

                    Hope you get this sorted soon.
                    1972 Viva restoration thread - http://www.thecorsa.co.uk/projects-b....html#post1534

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                    • #11

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                      • #12
                        Glad you got it sorted in the end

                        Post a thread about the wiper with a photo of it and I'm sure someone can help.

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Leestons View Post
                          Glad you got it sorted in the end

                          Post a thread about the wiper with a photo of it and I'm sure someone can help.
                          OK. I'll take a pic tomorrow and post it in a new thread. I think it just needs a new wiper arm but not sure how they fit on. Screw maybe?

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                          • #14
                            Nut on the end of the shaft - easy thing to sort. They tend to corrode onto the shaft so if it sticks spray with WD40 and leave it overnight. If you can get hold of some PlusGas releasing fluid that shifts them.
                            1972 Viva restoration thread - http://www.thecorsa.co.uk/projects-b....html#post1534

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                            • #15
                              In days of old when knights' were bold and batteries less reliable, 5 years would have been a ripe old age, but these days, you can normally double that - and some more.
                              Glad that you have it sorted.

                              Regards

                              PS With regards to the rear wiper, have a look under 'Interior and Exterior' There is some recent comments on there about the same problem.
                              Last edited by walksall; 07-03-2016, 04:28 PM. Reason: PS

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