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  • Quick question

    16 year old just purchased 1.4 corsa 08 plate was wondering what is the max time diameter and width I can fit on it and any recommendations on what wheels sizes to run ?

  • #2
    Hi
    Welcome to the forum

    The following web site lists the standard wheel and tyre sizes for a 1.4 corsa D. Opel Corsa 2008 - Wheel & Tire Sizes, PCD, Offset and Rims specs - Wheel-Size.com

    Personally i would stick to one of those sizes to avoid any physical problems such as rubbing on wheel arches, suspension etc, or handling downsides or extra strain on wheel bearings ,steering parts etc.

    If you really wish to push boundaries , especially if the suspension is lowered ,wide wheels etc , you may need more expert advice than I can give. But the following web site gives info on compatibility between wheel sizes and a graphic display of how much they will stick out etc. https://www.willtheyfit.com/


    Sorry to put a dampener on it but I should point out that many, if not most , Insurers regard non standard wheels as a a notifiable modification. Some might accept them at no extra cost,as long as they are declared but you should check with the insurer . And some may not insure a 17 year old at all with a modified car.

    Also , if you plan to include the 17 year old as a named driver on someone elses policy any modifications and personalisation of the car are quite likely to void the insurance. They will not pay out.
    I doubt you will convince them that Granny is a bit of a wild child who likes modified wheels and a fancy sound system, not the 17 year old supposed occasional user ..


    Comment


    • #3
      The other important point about modified cars, is that, you would probably never recoup your money if you came to sell the car.
      There are two main reasons for this: (1) Many people (including myself) wouldn't buy a car that has been modified, especially if the person doing the work was not a qualified mechanic. (2) Your idea of an 'improvement' may well not be what other people would wish to have.

      Another point about altering manufacturers specifications, is that car makers spend a fortune on developing a car - (I'm not saying that it can't be improved on) but in general, that particular model is tested to destruction, and is deemed to be safe in its original build form.

      Enjoy your car, give it some TLC and if you really wish to 'treat' it, change its engine oil and filter more frequently than stated in the handbook.

      Take care in your driving, there are a lot of idiots on the road who you need to avoid!

      Regards

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by Bugman View Post
        Hi
        Welcome to the forum

        The following web site lists the standard wheel and tyre sizes for a 1.4 corsa D. Opel Corsa 2008 - Wheel & Tire Sizes, PCD, Offset and Rims specs - Wheel-Size.com

        Personally i would stick to one of those sizes to avoid any physical problems such as rubbing on wheel arches, suspension etc, or handling downsides or extra strain on wheel bearings ,steering parts etc.

        If you really wish to push boundaries , especially if the suspension is lowered ,wide wheels etc , you may need more expert advice than I can give. But the following web site gives info on compatibility between wheel sizes and a graphic display of how much they will stick out etc. https://www.willtheyfit.com/


        Sorry to put a dampener on it but I should point out that many, if not most , Insurers regard non standard wheels as a a notifiable modification. Some might accept them at no extra cost,as long as they are declared but you should check with the insurer . And some may not insure a 17 year old at all with a modified car.

        Also , if you plan to include the 17 year old as a named driver on someone elses policy any modifications and personalisation of the car are quite likely to void the insurance. They will not pay out.
        I doubt you will convince them that Granny is a bit of a wild child who likes modified wheels and a fancy sound system, not the 17 year old supposed occasional user ..

        Cheers for that pal will have a look and take on board your thoughts and guidance

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by walksall View Post
          The other important point about modified cars, is that, you would probably never recoup your money if you came to sell the car.
          There are two main reasons for this: (1) Many people (including myself) wouldn't buy a car that has been modified, especially if the person doing the work was not a qualified mechanic. (2) Your idea of an 'improvement' may well not be what other people would wish to have.

          Another point about altering manufacturers specifications, is that car makers spend a fortune on developing a car - (I'm not saying that it can't be improved on) but in general, that particular model is tested to destruction, and is deemed to be safe in its original build form.

          Enjoy your car, give it some TLC and if you really wish to 'treat' it, change its engine oil and filter more frequently than stated in the handbook.

          Take care in your driving, there are a lot of idiots on the road who you need to avoid!

          Regards
          Will give it plenty of TLC thx for replying appreciate your help

          Comment


          • #6
            Just to clarify, 'standard' wheels means the wheels that were fitted to the car when new. A high end model that was fitted with 17" alloys from new will be in a higher insurance group and will be expected to have them. . If you fit the very same , 16 or 17" genuine GM wheels to a model that originally had 14" steels it may be regarded as a modification.

            Although less likely, if you fit narrower wheels or tyres to a car that originally had wider wheels to deal with its performance this may also be unacceptable as it compromises handling.

            Some insurers may accept non standard wheels, and some other modifications , at no extra cost as long as they are declared . There are some insurance companies who are more willing to accept younger drivers and modification at more reasonable cost. These tend to be smaller specialist underwriters and it may pay you to use an insurance broker to find one.

            But bear in mind all insurance companies share data. If you give information for a quote, on line or in person, to one insurer ,but change ,or fail to mention things, for the next quote they will know. They are happy to take your cash without bothering to check much but tend to look very hard for ways of avoiding liability in the event of a claim.Especially a large one involving personal injuries etc. They will check the history of quotes for anomalies , and physically examine the car for mods.

            Sorry if I have gone into a lot of detail that might not apply to you. But quite a lot of folk fit alloys without thinking about insurance implications or declaring them. In 'the old days' insurers might just have refused to pay out for the theft of alloys or sound systems that were not declared. This might still be the case if the wheels are reasonable ,and the policy holder and driver details are otherwise legitimate. But they just might refuse to pay out anything, including a huge claim against you from the third party.

            Comment

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