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Corsa 1.3cdti jump started then cut out, main fuse issue?

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  • [Corsa D 2006-2014] Corsa 1.3cdti jump started then cut out, main fuse issue?

    Hello fellow members, I have a corsa d 1.3cdti that has been stood a while (6 weeks)& the battery went bang flat with not enough charge in it to work the alarm or central locking so I jump started the car from a scorpion jump pack which started the car after 3 or 4 times of trying it then ran for about 1/2 minutes & cut out & the ignition lights were on but it would not turn over so I thought the jump pack was flat so I got another car & tried to jump it from that but again the ignition lights came on but it would not turn over. Could there be a main fuse that has blown or something similar?

  • #2
    Hi . These corsa D don't like to be jump started as a lot of the electronics systems run on 5 volts and can't take the spike from a jump pack without a built in protection voltage. Or even worse, jump leads off another car that's battery is alot more powerful. It's like your house getting struck by lightning and your cable box or wifi hub is not working afterwards. If it was me, as the car has been off the road for so long .I would buy a new battery or try a good know second hand one . And see what you get from the key . Then at least someone could trace where the voltage power is reaching. When you turn on the ignition have you got the letter F showing on the dash? Jump starts normally disperse the power to the BCM .which is the body control unit, which basically sends signals to all the internal electrical components. Its behind the glove box . You could try disconnecting and reconnecting the connections on the BCM With the ignition on and see if that will bring it back to life.

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    • #3
      Originally posted by Restorer View Post
      Hi . These corsa D don't like to be jump started as a lot of the electronics systems run on 5 volts and can't take the spike from a jump pack without a built in protection voltage. Or even worse, jump leads off another car that's battery is alot more powerful. It's like your house getting struck by lightning and your cable box or wifi hub is not working afterwards. If it was me, as the car has been off the road for so long .I would buy a new battery or try a good know second hand one . And see what you get from the key . Then at least someone could trace where the voltage power is reaching. When you turn on the ignition have you got the letter F showing on the dash? Jump starts normally disperse the power to the BCM .which is the body control unit, which basically sends signals to all the internal electrical components. Its behind the glove box . You could try disconnecting and reconnecting the connections on the BCM With the ignition on and see if that will bring it back to life.
      Thanks

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      • #4
        It wont help with your current problem but I notice you mentioned an alarm. If this is an after market one it may have been be the cause of the battery going flat due to 'parasitic loss'. This could happen again even with a new battery. . My battery sometimes went flat in about 6 weeks untiI I disabled part of the alarm system by unplugging an optional extra shock sensor. Its been fine since.

        But Restorer, your warning about jump starting is both timely (for me)and worrying. Until now I have not needed to jump start. I was able to charge the battery at home using a charger. But I am shortly to leave the car for 4 weeks at an airport hotel. I had planned to seek a jump start from another vehicle should it be necessary.

        I have just read the AA's advice on how to jump start a car .As well as the normal warnings about in which order and how to connect and disconnect the leads they say leave the cars connected for a few minutes before attempting to start either car. This is to allow the batteries to equalise, and the flat battery to partly recharge ,rather than everything coming through the jump leads. Do you think this would neutralise any risk of 'spikes' etc.?

        But I think the battery is OE from when the car was new and is now nearly 10 years old. It is to my knowledge at least 8 years old, and still giving good service! In which case its probably a no brainer for me to buy a new fully charged battery locally rather than risk a jump start. But I was hoping the battery would see out my ownership of the car.

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        • #5
          One of the greatest dangers with jump starting, is when the jump leads are disconnected, it is at this point where a voltage spike is likely to occur. It goes like this:
          The battery is flat in the first place, that's why it needs 'jumping' - even if the normal guidelines have been followed ( Connect positive to positive and negative to negative,connect the positive leads to both vehicles first - then the negatives, making sure that the connections are made 'cleanly' without any rapid connecting/disconnecting as the leads are clipped on - this in itself can cause a voltage spike).
          The next part is critical, but often abused - What happens is that the vehicle with the 'good' battery is often started at this stage for two reasons (1) To prevent the situation of ending up with TWO flat batteries should the engine with the 'flat' be difficult to start (2) To give a bit more 'umf' when starting.
          When the engine starts, the battery is still more-or-less flat, yet the running engine is trying to charge both batteries, disconnecting the jump leads can generate a voltage spike, which could do damage to BOTH cars. This is why it is suggested that the leads should be left in place for a few minutes, simply to reduce the difference in voltages to a 'safe' level.

          In the days of dynamos, the worst that could happen, is that there would be a few sparks flying if the connections were wrongly made, but since the advent of electronics, a LOT more care needs to be taken - Slave batteries (jump packs) can help to prevent this - but there is till the risk of a spike when it is disconnected.

          Regards

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          • #6
            Bugman I can guarantee, that your 10 year old battery will be as flat as a pancake after 4 weeks being left in a Airport carpark, especially if the weather is going to be cold. Walksall is right in the procedure for the jump leads. But if you have a little 1lt or 1.2lt corsa and you try jump starting off say a diesel 2.5 . The difference in Amps could blow the BCM. Some jump packs have spike protection built in. I use a spike protector that I clamp across the battery, then clamp the jump leads to that. It's a bit of kit I used to use when I worked for a breakdown company and forgot to return it when I left😉 . The company bought it because after many jump starts it would blow the fuse in the back of radios .

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            • #7
              I agree with what you say about a 10 year old battery. Yet incredibly since I fixed the parasitic drain this battery has several times started the car without problem or any sign of flatness after its been sitting idle for 6 weeks. I cant believe it either. Its a 1.3 cdti diesel. First couple of times I disconnected the battery while I was away but its still been ok when left connected. . I was expecting to have to charge it up and then get a new battery , but its still going strong.

              Sods law it will chose to fail when I am far from home. But this parking arrangement (in Bulgaria) will be saving enough on taxis and inconvenience that its worth the risk even if I have to buy a new battery near the car park .. I would need to get one anyway. .But its not worth frying anything.

              I've never had a battery last anywhere near this long and would love to buy another one the same . Its a fairy obscure brand from the far east. IIRC its called something like Solus. They have probably gone bust because no one needs to buy replacements every few years !.

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              • #8
                Update. Solus are my all season tyres! The battery is Solite made by the Sungwoo Automotive company Ltd. Korea. The website on the battery Solite.co.kr no longer connects. It was fitted to the car when I bought it, 2 years old, about 8 years ago. I can only assume it has thicker plates than normal. Deep cycle batterieswith thicker plates can have a service life of 15 years.

                My plan A is to disconnect the battery and hope for the best. Plan B. You can now buy jump leads with built in surge protection. I shall buy a set anyway in the uk and take them out. . . Plan C ,buy a new battery locally ,
                Plan D, call for break down . Plan E . I have put the battery charger in the boot. Could charge the battery at the hotel and have a day out in Sofia. Dont worry about me folks, the hotel has a nice restaurant

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                • #9
                  Wow, how times have moved on. Jump leads with surge protection. Your planning reads like something from the Great Escape ( Tom, Dick, Harry) I would go for plan E as long as they do a full English . Have a good trip.

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                  • #10
                    I've found these so far Cosmos Booster Cables With Surge Protection Car Battery Charger Jump Leads Start 5018196621058 | eBay

                    But they are only 400 amp I think they might be too piddly to start a diesel . Beefier ones get expensive.

                    I have done a bit more research. I didnt understand a lot of it. It seems the biggest danger to the disabled car from spikes and surges is when the battery is completely flat, (as a dodo. ) Once you get the car running and alternator delivering its 14 volts suddenly disconnecting a jump lead will cause a power dump and spike in voltage. Normally a partly charged battery can surpress most of this, but a completely flat battery does not, increasing the risk. It might cope, it might not.

                    But the donor car is also at risk. If a lead is disconnected while the donor car is running this produces a power spike. And it can be especially bad if its being revved.

                    It can probably be done safely even with ordinary jump leads,(which i have) as long a its done properly, But I'm not sure I can communicate this to someone who may have years of experience jump starting Ladas and Moskvitches.

                    So if the battery is completely dead I wont even try, just buy a new battery. If it just needs a bit of help i'll see how it goes. The Restaurant option was mainly to keep my wife relatively happy. I will still be slaving away in the cold. I do tend to over- think things !

                    Oh I do miss starting handles. Then all you had to worry about was breaking your arm. Or doing your back in , or blisters.
                    Last edited by Bugman; 25-02-2020, 01:26 PM.

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                    • #11
                      Starting handles: Or breaking your thumb for people who didn't know how to hold it properly - It might be a bit of a problem fitting one to a transverse engine

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                      • #12
                        Just an update. I had expected to leave the car for 1 month but due to Covid travel restrictions it was parked, untouched, for 4 months ! Fortunately I had taken the precaution of disconnecting the negative battery lead. Yesterday I connected the negative lead and the car started immediately with absolutely no signs of the battery being flat. Amazing for a 10 year old battery. Just prior to parking it had made a 250Km journey.

                        I had another car with me and jump leads. Had the battery held some charge but not enough to start I would have tried cautiously jump starting it. To minimise the chances of damage caused by a 'spike from either of the car alternators when disconnecting the jump leads I would have left both cars connected and running for 15 minutes,to give some charge then switched both off prior to disconnecting the jump leads .

                        If the battery had been completely dead I would not have attempted jump starting but gone and bought a new battery locally. Fortunately I saved the cost of a new battery but not the £200 secure parking charges! My scheme to save on Taxi fares bit me on the bum big time.

                        Restorers opinion that it would be flat in a month is certainly true had the battery been left connected. But when disconnected car batteries have a fairly slow self discharge rate.

                        Its probably too late for those cars left untouched due to lockdown but if you expect to leave a car unused for a long period its a good idea to disconnect the battery. (make sure you know how any radio security codes that might be required.) If at all possible keep the battery topped up using a battery charger.

                        Since the original post I have heard of other Corsa owners who are still getting good service from its original 10 year old battery, and others who replaced the battery just because they believed they were pushing their luck with such an old battery , not because of actual need.

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Bugman View Post
                          Just an update. I had expected to leave the car for 1 month but due to Covid travel restrictions it was parked, untouched, for 4 months ! Fortunately I had taken the precaution of disconnecting the negative battery lead. Yesterday I connected the negative lead and the car started immediately with absolutely no signs of the battery being flat. Amazing for a 10 year old battery. Just prior to parking it had made a 250Km journey.

                          I had another car with me and jump leads. Had the battery held some charge but not enough to start I would have tried cautiously jump starting it. To minimise the chances of damage caused by a 'spike from either of the car alternators when disconnecting the jump leads I would have left both cars connected and running for 15 minutes,to give some charge then switched both off prior to disconnecting the jump leads .

                          If the battery had been completely dead I would not have attempted jump starting but gone and bought a new battery locally. Fortunately I saved the cost of a new battery but not the £200 secure parking charges! My scheme to save on Taxi fares bit me on the bum big time.

                          Restorers opinion that it would be flat in a month is certainly true had the battery been left connected. But when disconnected car batteries have a fairly slow self discharge rate.

                          Its probably too late for those cars left untouched due to lockdown but if you expect to leave a car unused for a long period its a good idea to disconnect the battery. (make sure you know how any radio security codes that might be required.) If at all possible keep the battery topped up using a battery charger.

                          Since the original post I have heard of other Corsa owners who are still getting good service from its original 10 year old battery, and others who replaced the battery just because they believed they were pushing their luck with such an old battery , not because of actual need.
                          Glad to hear it, shame about the parking costs! I'm still not even sure how to deal with my battery, I believe the newer Golf's have AGM batteries (due to stop-start) and the car itself needs to be aware of the current when charging making it difficult to jump start or even charge with a battery charger. For now I'll just hope it never runs flat
                          TheCorsa's friendly predator

                          I like my women like I like my laptop. Thin, virus free and on my lap


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                          • #14
                            ah yes what I said may only apply to 'normal' batteries. These new fangled things for stop start, hybrids and the like could be very different.. As we said before, bring back starting handles.

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                            • #15
                              ....... or even batteries that you could check with a hydrometer.

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