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Smelly smoke & chugging!

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  • Smelly smoke & chugging!

    Hi
    My corsa recently started chugging and throwing out a fowl/burning smelling smoke from the tailpipe.
    the oil is black on the dipstick and the oil cap is fine/clean.
    It now takes a few times to turn over before the engine starts/will run and itwill not rev, even if I put my foot to the floor.
    Not currently driving the car.
    Any ideas?
    I recently had my turbo boost fitted, after a loss of power.
    Cheers
    Last edited by Sue; 24-12-2018, 11:28 AM.

  • #2
    What model/engine is the car?
    TheCorsa's friendly predator

    I like my women like I like my laptop. Thin, virus free and on my lap


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    • #3
      It's a 1.3 corsa design cdti.
      oil cap looks fine, not milky, nor is oil.
      Last edited by Sue; 23-12-2018, 06:54 PM.

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      • #4
        Rather than making what could be 'expensive' guesses as to your problem - (expensive, that is as we could very easily make a wrong guess, and you could end up fitting parts that you may not really need) I would recommend that you have the fault codes read to see what may be the cause of your problem.
        As there could be some 'historic' codes still stored in there, it would be best to have the codes read, make a note of any codes that show up, clear or delete any codes and then run the car for a day or two (if it is anything like drivable - if it isn't drivable, any current faults should throw up a code pretty much straight away.) After that, have the codes read again, so that any codes are now known to be 'fresh' or up-to-date ones which will hopefully point you to the seat of the problem.

        Has the car had a FULL service recently? Maintaining the services is the best way to avoid problems in the first place.

        It is worth checking that the engine oil level isn't HIGHER than it should be, which COULD indicate dilution by fuel and MIGHT account for the pong from the exhaust. However, since it is difficult to start and will not 'rev', the converse may be the case, or even a blockage in the exhaust system - but as I have said, get the codes read first of all.

        Happy new year.

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        • #5
          The Vauxhall Corsa 1.3 CDTi have very few issues. The main one is ECU failure. But seeing the vehicle is running. it could be something daft like a jammed EGR Valve. This would also cause it to be sluggish. They normally can be cleaned up and put back on, This can be tested with a good diagnostic machine. Also anything else on the vehicle that would cause excessive smoke or smell could be turbo seals and turbo failure. This will also cause sluggy action and no response to hard throttle. The smoke coming from the car is it White or a bluey white. ?

          If its bluey white it could be oil seal in the turbo gone or the main shaft bearing in the turbo as collapsed and that as caused the fins biting into the turbo walls as caused the seals to go that pumps engine oil into the exhaust pipe hence the bluey smoke that smells like burnt oil from the back

          alittle more info would help. I am an auto diagnostics engineer and do diagnostics for a living. If i can help i will. Regards DCVLUK

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          • #6
            Hi
            Thanks for your help.
            The car has a yearly service (next due the end of May) and had only just passed it's mot a week or so before the problem started I had noticed that the mechanic had been a little heavy handed with the oil a few years back, but it has been kept at the correct level since.
            I have run a diagnostics test, all be it on a cheap machine and it shows no faults, nor are there any warning lights on the dash.
            The smoke, I would say, is blue.
            I had the turbo boost fitted, as the car had lost power/pull and that sorted the problem so I'm now wondering if it is something linked to the turbo or the fitting.
            I do have a video, but unfortunately cannot upload it on here.
            Thanks again and happy new year.
            ​​​​​

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            • #7
              A rough guide to exhaust smoke colours:
              White smoke is generally caused by water in the combustion. In very cold weather, there tends to be a fair bit of white smoke when the engine is first started, this is nothing at all to worry about, as it is caused by cold moist air being taken into the engine along with condensation which may also be present in a cold engine. Also in cold weather, and especially if the car has only made short journeys, there can be moisture or actual water in the exhaust system - again, nothing to worry about, as this is condensation and will dry out with a decent run.
              If white smoke is combined with abnormal coolant loss, this can be an indication of a failed cylinder head gasket or even a cracked cylinder head

              Blue smoke generally indicates that engine oil is being burned, this can be due to worn cylinders, pistons and/or piston rings and is generally more noticeable when pulling hard (up hill, say, in too high a gear). It can also indicate worn calve guides and/or valve stem oil seals - in this case, it is most noticeable after the engine has been idling (at traffic lights say) when you first open the throttle to move on.
              In the case of a turbo engine, it can also be related to the turbo, as DCVL explains above.

              Black smoke is normally associated with incomplete burning of fuel, either due to too little air or too much fuel.

              On at least one occasion, I have come across a plastic bag which had been drawn into the air cleaner, the complaint was that the engine lacked power and there was a lot of black exhaust smoke.

              The smell of the smoke can also be a clue as to what is causing it, unfortunately, this is difficult to put into words, but a more 'acrid' smell could be caused by incomplete combustion of the fuel. Again, care needs to be taken when using smell as a diagnostic aid, as even a healthy engine can produce hydrogen sulphide smell when first started, which would probably be due to the catalytic converter (cat) being cold (they only work at very heigh temperature)

              Happy new year.

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