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  • [Corsa E 2014-2019] Few questions about wheels

    Hi,
    First of all I'd like to apologise if these questions have already been asked, I'm quite new to this whole car mod thing and I'm still learning.
    1.) How do I check what size my alloys are? I have a corsa white edition 1.4T and I'm pretty sure I've got 17" alloys but I'm not 100% sure, how do I check this?
    2.) Is there a good site out there where I can get cheap but still good quality rims? I've had a look and the only decent ones I've found seem to be around 1k for a set of 4 and I don't really have this money to spend on alloys.
    3.) If I do find a set of alloys, is it possible to transfer the tyres from my current alloys to the new alloys without the help of a garage?
    4.) I don't currently have a spare tyre in my car and want to get one just to be safe, could anyone point me in the right direction to finding one?
    Thanks a lot for reading, and I greatly appreciate any replies or answers!

  • #2
    1. If you look at the tyres it'll say something like 205/55R16 - the R16 bit would mean 16" (the 205 bit is the width of the tyre in mm, and the 55 bit is the profile of the tyre).
    2. Many sites really, it's just about finding what you like, 'branded' wheels often aren't cheap though.
    3. I doubt it, at least not without damaging the new/old alloys and possibly the tyres, there is a reason tyre places use a machine! It doesn't usually cost much to get tyres changed.
    4. If you're getting new wheels you *could* use one of your existing alloys as a spare, if it's the same size as the new wheels it'd be better anyway as you wouldn't be speed restricted - not sure it'd fit in the space in the boot though so you might have to try that.
    TheCorsa's friendly predator

    I like my women like I like my laptop. Thin, virus free and on my lap


    Comment


    • #3
      Hi
      Time for one of my typical long posts

      As JT says changing tyres yourself is realistically not an option. Especially on alloy wheels. It really needs a professional tyre changing machine to remove the old tyre , then you need to change over the pressure monitor valves, then a machine to party install the tyre on the new rim , and a compressor to inflate the tyre rapidly enough the bead will reset. And last but not least its essential the tyres are balanced using professional dynamic balancing machine The chances of doing all this manually using sledgehammers and massive tyre levers without damage to the tyre or rim or pressure monitor are almost nil. And believe me its a pig of a job.

      If you buy tyres on line from the likes of Blackcircles or Mytyres they list local fitting agents - ie independent tyre depots, who will do the fitting. These typically charge £15 per wheel , although some charge extra for alloy wheels - which require a lot of extra care to avoid damage. You may be able to get it done cheaper at a small place, especially if you pay cash. I dont call this cheap and you really have to be sure your existing tyres have enough tread left to justify it. It might be heart breaking to replace tyres with say 4mm tread remaining.They look to have plenty of life left, but is it worth £15 for a tyre that maysoon need replacing?

      Also what do you propose doing with the wheels you take off. If the tyres have good tread left you may be able to sell them for more with decent tyres still fitted. If they are manufacturers standard wheels you may get a better price selling them singly, for owners who have mangled a wheel.

      Ideally keep the old wheels with its tyres fitted. You can use one as the spare. And maybe fit the 'old 'set during the winter to avoid salt etc.. This will extend your available tyre life and might one day allow you to delay buying new tyres , especially if you plan to sell the car soon. Plus you can sell the car with its original wheels and keep your good set. Only problem might be keeping both sets with pressure monitor valves,which are quite expensive and need to be programmed to the car. These are required to pass the mot if the car had them originally. . (although my local mot tester /tyre depot did nod the wink that a set of wheels with winter tyres might be used with ordinary cheap valves as long as the pressure monitored set were fitted for the mot test. Not strictly legal )

      Insisting on reusing your own tyres limits your options to the same size of wheel. If your existing ones are 16" you might fancy 17" Even if you have 17" wheels you might find a great deal on a really nice set of 16". Customising enthusiasts may see this as unacceptable aesthetically but actually 17" wheels do have some down sides ,not least in ride comfort. You can look up these pros and cons on line.

      I dont know of any places that will be significantly cheaper , but there are places , such as Blackcircles and mytyres (I think) that sell packages of wheels including fitted tyres. This might work out a good deal overall , especially if you are able to sell your old wheels with tyres fitted. But sorry I doubt you are going to get much change from £1000. Customising costs money and expensive mistakes can be made. At least with wheels you can get some of your money back by resale. Other 'improvements' may be lost for ever and might even reduce the value of the car. .

      If you are making such a large purchase dont limit your search to the UK. You may find a better deal buying from another country such as Germany ,that will arrive by courier just as quickly as they will from a uk supplier. But i doubt it. Exchange rates are volatile and UK tyre and wheel prices are quite competitive.

      BTW the same car can take different sized wheels .The crucial factor is the overall diameter needs to be near enough the same. Thus a 16" wheel with say 55 side wall profile might be the same as a 17" with lower profile sidewall tyres , say 40. You can check out the available wheel and tyre options with this on line calculator https://www.willtheyfit.com/

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by jt999 View Post
        1. If you look at the tyres it'll say something like 205/55R16 - the R16 bit would mean 16" (the 205 bit is the width of the tyre in mm, and the 55 bit is the profile of the tyre).
        2. Many sites really, it's just about finding what you like, 'branded' wheels often aren't cheap though.
        3. I doubt it, at least not without damaging the new/old alloys and possibly the tyres, there is a reason tyre places use a machine! It doesn't usually cost much to get tyres changed.
        4. If you're getting new wheels you *could* use one of your existing alloys as a spare, if it's the same size as the new wheels it'd be better anyway as you wouldn't be speed restricted - not sure it'd fit in the space in the boot though so you might have to try that.
        Thank you so much for the insightful and quick reply!

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by Bugman View Post
          Hi
          Time for one of my typical long posts

          As JT says changing tyres yourself is realistically not an option. Especially on alloy wheels. It really needs a professional tyre changing machine to remove the old tyre , then you need to change over the pressure monitor valves, then a machine to party install the tyre on the new rim , and a compressor to inflate the tyre rapidly enough the bead will reset. And last but not least its essential the tyres are balanced using professional dynamic balancing machine The chances of doing all this manually using sledgehammers and massive tyre levers without damage to the tyre or rim or pressure monitor are almost nil. And believe me its a pig of a job.

          If you buy tyres on line from the likes of Blackcircles or Mytyres they list local fitting agents - ie independent tyre depots, who will do the fitting. These typically charge £15 per wheel , although some charge extra for alloy wheels - which require a lot of extra care to avoid damage. You may be able to get it done cheaper at a small place, especially if you pay cash. I dont call this cheap and you really have to be sure your existing tyres have enough tread left to justify it. It might be heart breaking to replace tyres with say 4mm tread remaining.They look to have plenty of life left, but is it worth £15 for a tyre that maysoon need replacing?

          Also what do you propose doing with the wheels you take off. If the tyres have good tread left you may be able to sell them for more with decent tyres still fitted. If they are manufacturers standard wheels you may get a better price selling them singly, for owners who have mangled a wheel.

          Ideally keep the old wheels with its tyres fitted. You can use one as the spare. And maybe fit the 'old 'set during the winter to avoid salt etc.. This will extend your available tyre life and might one day allow you to delay buying new tyres , especially if you plan to sell the car soon. Plus you can sell the car with its original wheels and keep your good set. Only problem might be keeping both sets with pressure monitor valves,which are quite expensive and need to be programmed to the car. These are required to pass the mot if the car had them originally. . (although my local mot tester /tyre depot did nod the wink that a set of wheels with winter tyres might be used with ordinary cheap valves as long as the pressure monitored set were fitted for the mot test. Not strictly legal )

          Insisting on reusing your own tyres limits your options to the same size of wheel. If your existing ones are 16" you might fancy 17" Even if you have 17" wheels you might find a great deal on a really nice set of 16". Customising enthusiasts may see this as unacceptable aesthetically but actually 17" wheels do have some down sides ,not least in ride comfort. You can look up these pros and cons on line.

          I dont know of any places that will be significantly cheaper , but there are places , such as Blackcircles and mytyres (I think) that sell packages of wheels including fitted tyres. This might work out a good deal overall , especially if you are able to sell your old wheels with tyres fitted. But sorry I doubt you are going to get much change from £1000. Customising costs money and expensive mistakes can be made. At least with wheels you can get some of your money back by resale. Other 'improvements' may be lost for ever and might even reduce the value of the car. .

          If you are making such a large purchase dont limit your search to the UK. You may find a better deal buying from another country such as Germany ,that will arrive by courier just as quickly as they will from a uk supplier. But i doubt it. Exchange rates are volatile and UK tyre and wheel prices are quite competitive.

          BTW the same car can take different sized wheels .The crucial factor is the overall diameter needs to be near enough the same. Thus a 16" wheel with say 55 side wall profile might be the same as a 17" with lower profile sidewall tyres , say 40. You can check out the available wheel and tyre options with this on line calculator https://www.willtheyfit.com/
          Answered all my questions 110%, thank you!
          Few extra questions though -
          My tyres have recently been replaced and so I don't really plan on replacing them, I was thinking more along the lines of transferring the existing tyres onto a new set of alloys. I assume this can be done and is a viable option?
          This would also mean that I don't have a spare wheel, and I don't think my existing tyres would fit in my spare wheel compartment anyway, so I guess I have to buy a separate spare wheel.
          This is a slightly unrelated question, but do you know if VXR E body parts such as a front splitter would fit my 2017 E 1.4T?
          Once again thanks for your extremely detailed response!

          Comment


          • #6
            If the tyres are almost new its a possible option to swop them over to wheels of the same diameter. One other thing to watch is if the new wheels are a similar rim width. if for instance the old wheels are 7J (7" wide) and the new ones are wider (eg 9J) it might be a better option to fit tyres with a wider tread width. (the first number in the tyre sizing. ) Or you might end up chosing wheels just to to suit the old tyres, rather than wheels that best suit you and the car. You may soon regret not taking the opportunity to go for wider wheels and tyres when you had the chance

            . Yes it does mean a bigger initial outlay, but having two sets of wheels with decent tyres can save you money in the long run. You could fit the old wheels for the dark winter months,when appearance is less important ,saving the new ones for summer best .They will last longer and might mean you never have to replace any tyres during your ownership of the car . The car would be sold with its original wheels ,and you get to keep the new set -for your next car, or selling second hand. Or a choice of wheels negotiated with the buyer. I dont know your personal circumstances but its what i would do.

            Assuming the corsa E spare wheel well is similar to the D I think an alloy would fit near enough. The diameter should be fine. A wider rim width might mean it sits a bit higher than the boot floor level but probably only by about an inch. You could fit padding either side of the wheel so the boot floor mat sits level. Try it out using one of your existing wheels.

            Incidentally when you are deciding on alloys it a good idea to photoshop photos of the new wheels onto a photo of your car to see how it looks.

            Sorry I cant help re body parts.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by Bugman View Post
              If the tyres are almost new its a possible option to swop them over to wheels of the same diameter. One other thing to watch is if the new wheels are a similar rim width. if for instance the old wheels are 7J (7" wide) and the new ones are wider (eg 9J) it might be a better option to fit tyres with a wider tread width. (the first number in the tyre sizing. ) Or you might end up chosing wheels just to to suit the old tyres, rather than wheels that best suit you and the car. You may soon regret not taking the opportunity to go for wider wheels and tyres when you had the chance

              . Yes it does mean a bigger initial outlay, but having two sets of wheels with decent tyres can save you money in the long run. You could fit the old wheels for the dark winter months,when appearance is less important ,saving the new ones for summer best .They will last longer and might mean you never have to replace any tyres during your ownership of the car . The car would be sold with its original wheels ,and you get to keep the new set -for your next car, or selling second hand. Or a choice of wheels negotiated with the buyer. I dont know your personal circumstances but its what i would do.

              Assuming the corsa E spare wheel well is similar to the D I think an alloy would fit near enough. The diameter should be fine. A wider rim width might mean it sits a bit higher than the boot floor level but probably only by about an inch. You could fit padding either side of the wheel so the boot floor mat sits level. Try it out using one of your existing wheels.

              Incidentally when you are deciding on alloys it a good idea to photoshop photos of the new wheels onto a photo of your car to see how it looks.

              Sorry I cant help re body parts.
              Thank you for your reply!
              Just to clarify, I could get a 16" spare wheel and it would still work with my other three 17" wheels if I were to get a flat as long as the width is correct?

              Comment


              • #8
                If you go to this web site and look up the exact model and year of your car it lists all the wheel and tyre size combinations that could be used as an emergency temporary spare. Opel Corsa 2014 - Wheel & Tire Sizes, PCD, Offset and Rims specs - Wheel-Size.com

                All will have about the same rolling diameter. even 15" steel wheels. Only slight problem is its technically illegal to use odd sized tyres on the same axle. An exemption is made for emergency spacesaver tyres to get you to the nearest garage. These are allowed because they are so obviously wrong and spindly you wouldnt be tempted to leave it on any longer than necessary or drive too fast. With a speed limit label. But with a full sized tyre that is almost correct you might take your time changing it, forget its on until you,literally, come unstuck due to the handling differences involved.

                Personally I take the view that a nearly correct full sized spare is preferable to a spacesaver, if only used in an emergency , but you need to act responsibly and change it again asap. It shouldnt pass the mot with it on the car. In some respects a 15" steel might be best. It wont handle as well as a 16" used with 17 inchers but you are less likely to leave it on longer than necessary. .

                But I was hoping to persuade you to bite the bullet, and buy wheels with tyres of your choice fitted free by the supplier. By the time you pay to get 4 possibly 5 tyres swopped it could be the cost of one tyre, and you may need to buy another tyre and possibly a wheel for use as a spare. You've only saved the cost of 2 tyres when you could have had 4 spare usable wheels and tyres. No offence but if you drive the car in an enthusiastic VXR style you may be gobbling up tyres quite quickly anyway and having a spare set of wheels and tyres might allow you delay buying new tyres for a while instead of being forced into it when you can least afford it. Or being tempted to fit nasty squeally fast wearing budget tyres . But I havnt factored in the cost of including 4 new tyre pressure monitor valves

                Incidentally did your car come with a jack and wheel brace or just a can of puncture repair spray? The cost of these , and possibly having to buy different wheel nuts/bolts , and bore adjustment spigots for the replacement wheels are possible additional costs .
                Last edited by Bugman; 12-06-2020, 07:46 AM.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by Bugman View Post
                  If you go to this web site and look up the exact model and year of your car it lists all the wheel and tyre size combinations that could be used as an emergency temporary spare. Opel Corsa 2014 - Wheel & Tire Sizes, PCD, Offset and Rims specs - Wheel-Size.com

                  All will have about the same rolling diameter. even 15" steel wheels. Only slight problem is its technically illegal to use odd sized tyres on the same axle. An exemption is made for emergency spacesaver tyres to get you to the nearest garage. These are allowed because they are so obviously wrong and spindly you wouldnt be tempted to leave it on any longer than necessary or drive too fast. With a speed limit label. But with a full sized tyre that is almost correct you might take your time changing it, forget its on until you,literally, come unstuck due to the handling differences involved.

                  Personally I take the view that a nearly correct full sized spare is preferable to a spacesaver, if only used in an emergency , but you need to act responsibly and change it again asap. It shouldnt pass the mot with it on the car. In some respects a 15" steel might be best. It wont handle as well as a 16" used with 17 inchers but you are less likely to leave it on longer than necessary. .

                  But I was hoping to persuade you to bite the bullet, and buy wheels with tyres of your choice fitted free by the supplier. By the time you pay to get 4 possibly 5 tyres swopped it could be the cost of one tyre, and you may need to buy another tyre and possibly a wheel for use as a spare. You've only saved the cost of 2 tyres when you could have had 4 spare usable wheels and tyres. No offence but if you drive the car in an enthusiastic VXR style you may be gobbling up tyres quite quickly anyway and having a spare set of wheels and tyres might allow you delay buying new tyres for a while instead of being forced into it when you can least afford it. Or being tempted to fit nasty squeally fast wearing budget tyres . But I havnt factored in the cost of including 4 new tyre pressure monitor valves

                  Incidentally did your car come with a jack and wheel brace or just a can of puncture repair spray? The cost of these , and possibly having to buy different wheel nuts/bolts , and bore adjustment spigots for the replacement wheels are possible additional costs .
                  Once again thanks for your reply!
                  The car only came with a can of puncture repair spray, but I've been told that this isn't the best solution and its better to have a spare wheel. I'm on quite a tight budget and so I'm not sure if i can quite spare enough money to get 4 new tyres, but of course ideally, I'd get new tyres for the new rims and use one of the old rims as a spare. Unfortunately, I'm looking to spend under £800 if possible and I'd rather get a good set of alloys and a cheap spare tyre than going ultra-cheap on everything and trying to squeeze four new tyres out of the budget too!

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    I can see where you are coming from. But over the years i have found that the need to replace tyres always seems to forced on me by being as smooth as a babies bum at mot time ,or ending up selling the car early rather than fitting new tyres and then waving goodbye to them soon afterwards. Regardless of whether I happen to be flush with cash at the time.

                    In my opinion having a backup set you could use as a spare, and fit for a while if you cant yet afford to replace your main tyres when they become due is too good an opportunity to miss.Personally I think it is quite likely you will come to regret not having pushed your budget now or delaying until you have enough cash.

                    Incidentally I did something similar on my Yaris. I needed to fit winter tyres and only had a spacesaver spare.Two of my summer tyres had about 6mm tread.The other two about due for replacement. My solution was to fit 4 x new all season tyres on my alloys, and buy two used alloy rims and had the summer tyres put on those. One acts as my full sized spare, with the option of putting both on the front in the summer to reduce wear on the all seasons. (winter rated) . Actually I have not so far bothered. The all seasons are wearing very well and will probably outlast the car! But I did get them swopped and fitted professionally in Bulgaria, where it only costs about £3 a wheel inc balancing.

                    I know its not my place to comment. Only you know your circumstances, and its your choice.

                    Comment

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