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Rear bumper paint reaction

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  • Rear bumper paint reaction

    Hey people. I had my rear bumper repainted (approx. 2-3 months ago) and now it has begun to crack (see picture). It was sprayed with aerosol spray paint beforehand, but because it wasn't a great finish I decided to get it done professionally. The resprayer was aware that spray paint had been used beforehand. Is this some kind of reaction that has occurred? I would have thought that the resprayer would have sanded back the previous paintwork and primed it so this wouldn't happen?

  • #2
    How much of it was resprayed professionally and was it done by a real professional place with good reviews? The picture makes the job look like it was done very poorly (not just the bit that has cracked), perhaps not prepared very well.
    TheCorsa's friendly predator

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    • #3
      It was all resprayed professionally by a professional body shop - they had good reviews too.

      Even the mark near the wheel arch looks suspect, I know I definitely haven't scratched it. Strange how it's just in that one corner and it hasn't reacted anywhere else!

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      • #4
        The problem of incompatible paints has existed since they were painting coaches pulled by horses.This looks similar to some compatibility issues I have had in the past between cellulose and acrylic primers/top coats ,two pack paints ,etching primers etc.etc. and problems with contamination,unsuitable solvents etc etc. But I am not a professional.

        It only in the last few years that paint technology , particularly with primers, has made it even possible to spray plastic panels successfully at all.

        This is not a great result from a professional. Looks to me he has assumed the original special plastic priming coat was still 100 % complete and perfect and that all subsequent coats of paint were compatible with it and still basically sound. He has then simply flattened down the imperfections. If it had been 100% sound it might have worked. .
        But it looks like high points along swage lines have been sanded through to non compatible paint or even plastic base. This may have been done by him , or during the earlier painting process with rattle cans.
        (incidentally were the cans to change the colour (or smarten up) an already painted bumper , or was it to paint a new one thats only in primer ?)

        He really should have sanded back to base and sprayed with a special plastics primer. But sanding away all the primer may cause sanding scores in the plastic surface requiring a thicker coat of primer and yet more work. It might even be cheaper overall to replace the bumper with a new ready primed one.
        All this would have added to the time and costs. Possibly beyond what you might have been prepared to pay.

        The line along the wheel arch could be a masking line. Ie he has realised the surface has been sanded through so he has masked the area off and sprayed an extra coat of primer in just that area. But the 'join' still shows when overpainted with top colour.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by Bugman View Post
          The problem of incompatible paints has existed since they were painting coaches pulled by horses.This looks similar to some compatibility issues I have had in the past between cellulose and acrylic primers/top coats ,two pack paints ,etching primers etc.etc. and problems with contamination,unsuitable solvents etc etc. But I am not a professional.

          It only in the last few years that paint technology , particularly with primers, has made it even possible to spray plastic panels successfully at all.

          This is not a great result from a professional. Looks to me he has assumed the original special plastic priming coat was still 100 % complete and perfect and that all subsequent coats of paint were compatible with it and still basically sound. He has then simply flattened down the imperfections. If it had been 100% sound it might have worked. .
          But it looks like high points along swage lines have been sanded through to non compatible paint or even plastic base. This may have been done by him , or during the earlier painting process with rattle cans.
          (incidentally were the cans to change the colour (or smarten up) an already painted bumper , or was it to paint a new one thats only in primer ?)

          He really should have sanded back to base and sprayed with a special plastics primer. But sanding away all the primer may cause sanding scores in the plastic surface requiring a thicker coat of primer and yet more work. It might even be cheaper overall to replace the bumper with a new ready primed one.
          All this would have added to the time and costs. Possibly beyond what you might have been prepared to pay.

          The line along the wheel arch could be a masking line. Ie he has realised the surface has been sanded through so he has masked the area off and sprayed an extra coat of primer in just that area. But the 'join' still shows when overpainted with top colour.
          This sounds very professional (this is the same what I was explained prior to any work started on my car)

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