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2002 Corsa Elegance - Passenger Side Rear Light Problem

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  • [Corsa C 2000-2006] 2002 Corsa Elegance - Passenger Side Rear Light Problem

    Greetings,

    Apologies for the title, I'm not sure which prefix to use - tips welcome

    I recently purchased a little 1.0 Corsa Elegance as my first car and it was working perfectly until a week or so ago.

    I noticed that I had a passenger side tail light out, so I unscrewed and popped the housing off, took a look and the bulb was fine, so I checked the fuse: that had blown. I replaced it with a 5A (as per the manual) and checked everything, it all worked fine again. Going forward a few days and the fuse had blown again, so after some research I looked at every part of the wiring I could get to - to see if I could find somewhere it would be shorting out - and looked for moisture/wear and tear but I'm somewhat limited by tools.

    I'm also getting an electric shock from the car every time I step out and close the door, but I'm not sure if that's related to my current problem.

    I know that replacing the fuse is a quick fix for a few days, but I'd rather get to the root of the problem and solve it once and for all.

    Any help would be greatly appreciated!

  • #2
    Check around drivers side headlight, as sidelight is on same fuse

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    • #3
      All the other lights are working fine with the fuse that's blown still in, and my manual says the rear light is controlled by a single 5A fuse that has nothing else connected.

      Comment


      • #4
        Strange, I had a short with front headlight and every time fuse popped it done the opposite side rear light.

        I don't know much about electrics though, so help is kind of limited to that in afraid

        Comment


        • #5
          I understand, that's why I'm here too! I'd take it to a mechanic but I've heard so many bad things about people getting ripped off that I'd rather at least try to sort it myself.

          Thanks anyway, I appreciate anything I can get at the moment

          Comment


          • #6
            Passenger side tail light is on fuse38 - also the parking light. If you leave the indicator on to turn left and withdraw the key then the lights on the side you are indicating stay on as parking lights.

            If could be a fault in the latter system rather than the tail light itself. You really need a multimeter to check current draw to why it is exceeding the correct amperage, so you need to check both the normal light circuit & the parking light operation.

            Getting a shock when you get out of the car could just be static, it happens with some cars and can depend on weather conditions and even what clothes you are wearing. It is possible a large static charge may indicate a problem, it just depends how big the shock it.

            Check if you are leaving the indicator on to the passenger side when you turn the engine off - if you are and the fuse is blowing try cancelling the indicators before turning off and see if that makes any difference.

            You can buy static discharge strips - but on cars which do it a lot I usually just tie a bit of wire around the exhaust or an old bit of thin chain. Just something that will touch the ground when you stop and discharge that way rather than through you. See if it makes any difference.

            I assume you've checked the light fitting to make sure there is nothing there leading to short, even a crack which moisture has got into can do it.
            1972 Viva restoration thread - http://www.thecorsa.co.uk/projects-b....html#post1534

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by Taurus View Post
              If could be a fault in the latter system rather than the tail light itself. You really need a multimeter to check current draw to why it is exceeding the correct amperage, so you need to check both the normal light circuit & the parking light operation.
              I'll grab a multimeter tomorrow and go through what I can. Is it possible to pick up the tool needed to access some of the casing?

              Originally posted by Taurus View Post
              Getting a shock when you get out of the car could just be static, it happens with some cars and can depend on weather conditions and even what clothes you are wearing. It is possible a large static charge may indicate a problem, it just depends how big the shock it.
              It happens no matter what I'm wearing, but it does feel more like a static shock than anything bigger. It just makes me look like a fool whenever I get out of the car!

              Originally posted by Taurus View Post
              Check if you are leaving the indicator on to the passenger side when you turn the engine off - if you are and the fuse is blowing try cancelling the indicators before turning off and see if that makes any difference.
              I make sure everything is off before I turn the engine off, I've read that it can cause problems later on.

              Originally posted by Taurus View Post
              You can buy static discharge strips - but on cars which do it a lot I usually just tie a bit of wire around the exhaust or an old bit of thin chain. Just something that will touch the ground when you stop and discharge that way rather than through you. See if it makes any difference.
              I'll look into this, thanks!

              Originally posted by Taurus View Post
              I assume you've checked the light fitting to make sure there is nothing there leading to short, even a crack which moisture has got into can do it.
              I have, but it was fairly early this morning so I'm not sure how thorough I was. I'll check it again.

              Comment


              • #8
                If you can still find an old fashioned hardware store who sells 'black lead' (Zebo), you could apply some to the inner walls of your tyres to conduct the static away.

                If the fuse is blowing frequently, try running without the bulb in the lamp for a while - if the fuse then doesn't blow, the problem is most likely in the bulb-holder.

                Regards

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by walksall View Post
                  If the fuse is blowing frequently, try running without the bulb in the lamp for a while - if the fuse then doesn't blow, the problem is most likely in the bulb-holder.
                  The issue with this is that I can't drive at night until the problem is fixed. I'd like to solve it as soon as I can (without too much expense, of course!)

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    I replaced the fuse again today and so far it's fine. It may have been the fuse brand I used previously, but I can't be sure without testing it over a longer drive.

                    Thanks for the help people have given so far, it's refreshing to see a helpful forum!

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Do remember Murphy's Law - (or one of em) - If it can go wrong, it will do!!

                      Keep an eye on it when it rains, you might find that dry crud in (say) the bulb holder, doesn't cause much trouble, but when it gets damp, it may conduct to earth and blow the fuse.
                      Regards

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                      • #12
                        It's been raining all day and I've been driving since 4pm or so, the light is still working and the fuse is fine. Maybe my taking it apart and cleaning everything solved the problem?

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                        • #13
                          So I had to use the car early this morning and did a quick check of the lights, the same one has gone again. I've tried a few different brands of fuse now so I'm left with diagnosing it with a multimeter and trying to fix it myself, or taking it to a mechanic and risk getting ripped off.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            when you have replaced the fuse,put the lights on. Then check to see if the fuse is getting noticeably warmer or hotter than other fuses before it blows ,which might indicate a continual slight short.You may be able to locate and diagnose this with a multimeter,or if something else also feels warm. If the fuse doesnt immediately blow, or get hot it may be the shorting is fast and sudden,triggered by vehicle movement.This would be difficult to diagnose with a multimeter. Replace the fuse and then put the lights on. Systematically trace the live feed, from light fitting to fuse box. Give each fitting,switch ,connection and length of wire a good joggle ,shaking and manipulation and a visual check. Hopefully the problem location will reveal itself by blowing the fuse at that moment . Pay particular attention to wensleydale cheese situations -( ie where wires pass through a grommet ! )
                            If you do need to use an auto electrician it may be best to discuss it with him first. If the job is likely to involve a lot of trim removal and replacement he might be happy to let you do this yourself.
                            Last edited by Bugman; 06-10-2015, 01:08 PM.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Bugman View Post
                              when you have replaced the fuse,put the lights on. Then check to see if the fuse is getting noticeably warmer or hotter than other fuses before it blows ,which might indicate a continual slight short.You may be able to locate and diagnose this with a multimeter,or if something else also feels warm. If the fuse doesnt immediately blow, or get hot it may be the shorting is fast and sudden,triggered by vehicle movement.This would be difficult to diagnose with a multimeter. Replace the fuse and then put the lights on. Systematically trace the live feed, from light fitting to fuse box. Give each fitting,switch ,connection and length of wire a good joggle ,shaking and manipulation and a visual check. Hopefully the problem location will reveal itself by blowing the fuse at that moment . Pay particular attention to wensleydale cheese situations -( ie where wires pass through a grommet ! )
                              If you do need to use an auto electrician it may be best to discuss it with him first. If the job is likely to involve a lot of trim removal and replacement he might be happy to let you do this yourself.
                              Excellent, this is what I needed. I need to find some time to pick up a multimeter, but I shall attempt to do so tomorrow and post the results. Thank you!

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