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What's the maximum size of battery that will fit a Corsa Mk3 1.4i Design(2009)?

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  • #31
    The human brain is a funny old thing - many a time I have 'remembered' smells as if they were still there, but in fact, long gone (thankfully in some cases!)

    I always buy oil filter elements from my local Vauxhall dealer, also their engine oil. At least I know that I am buying oil of the correct specification (Note: Specification, NOT viscosity)
    The oil filter element says 'Made in Germany' on the box - up to now, I have taken that to mean the contents, but Mr Bugman has now got me all paranoid as well - Is it only the box that is made in Germany??


    Regards

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    • #32
      Sorry guys. I didnt mean to make you paranoid. I sometimes get too cynical. With many things its not really worth worrying about . There have always been cheats and deceptions since the first hunter gatherer tried to trade a squirrel skin as sable. Caveat Emptor ,buyer beware.

      No. If you buy a filter from a vauxhall dealer it is almost certainly genuine and made in Germany as it says.

      The one I showed just happened to be for a Toyota . The filter is painted 'Toyota , made in Thailand' , and the box, a very close imitation of a genuine Toyota box, says 'Toyota motor corporation ,Thailand.' But the Alibaba listing states the filter is made by 'Dongjie' in Hebei , China. I have no objection to things being made in China as long as they are up front about it and I can make an assessment on quality vs price.
      Its clearly a fake, not genuine Toyota. So if you buy a ' Toyota' filter, or have one fitted ,anywhere but a Toyota main dealer there is a risk it will be a 'Dongjie' fake. An independent garage ,or small retailer might honestly believe it is genuine Toyota.

      Dongjie make no secret they will mark their range of filters with whatever brand name a wholesale buyer wants. They say you can have BWM, Mercedes, VW, Opel etc etc. Fair enough if you want your own brand such as " Bodgit and Scram budget filters" , but this is blatant piracy.


      Comment


      • #33
        Originally posted by walksall View Post
        The human brain is a funny old thing - many a time I have 'remembered' smells as if they were still there, but in fact, long gone (thankfully in some cases!)

        I always buy oil filter elements from my local Vauxhall dealer, also their engine oil. At least I know that I am buying oil of the correct specification (Note: Specification, NOT viscosity)
        The oil filter element says 'Made in Germany' on the box - up to now, I have taken that to mean the contents, but Mr Bugman has now got me all paranoid as well - Is it only the box that is made in Germany??
        OK! There's a funny smell in the car. I swear it's true. I climbed into it yesterday afternoon, when it was scorching hot weather, and the first thing I noticed was a faint malodour, but nowhere hear as bad as it was previously. Or was it just because I was expecting to smell it, and therefore did, but I was only experiencing a momentary 'psychosinatic' episode? Or are there really bacterium present, squatting and lurking within my air-con system, that's causing it? Your words of advice were on my mind for sure during the drive home.

        I did a search for "air-con spray cleaner" and found Holts Air Con Bomb. Recommended to use once a year. Looks genuine. Seems practical.

        [edit] Psychosinatic may not be a real word.


        Originally posted by Bugman View Post
        Sorry guys. I didnt mean to make you paranoid. I sometimes get too cynical. With many things its not really worth worrying about . There have always been cheats and deceptions since the first hunter gatherer tried to trade a squirrel skin as sable. Caveat Emptor ,buyer beware.

        If you buy a filter from a vauxhall dealer it is almost certainly genuine and made in Germany as it says.

        Dongjie make no secret they will mark their range of filters with whatever brand name a wholesale buyer wants. They say you can have BWM, Mercedes, VW, Opel etc etc. Fair enough if you want your own brand such as " Bodgit and Scram budget filters" , but this is blatant piracy.
        The label on the Champion oil filter box is covering some of the print on the box itself. I can see the word "Fabrique" and I guess the rest would be "en France". However, as Walksall clearly pointed out, it could just be the box thats printed in France and the contents could be made elsewhere. I'm going to have to pay a visit to the local Vauxhall dealer to get hold of a genuine Framwixmann & Beck filter. Then I'm going to send it off to "The Labs" (really it's my mate Dave in Sheffield who's got a Bosch & Becker workbench in his garage with a vice on it, plus he has some hand tools) to have it analysed. We'll find out who the fakers are... eventually.
        Last edited by Exaga; 16-05-2019, 06:33 AM.

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        • #34
          I doubt its just the box. The Chinese made Toyota fake had 'Fabrique en Thailande' on the box. And thats not France. The cynic in me says if the label obscures a country which some may find less impressive then maybe its not entirely a matter of chance . I dont think fakers would take this trouble, but the box may be designed so this happens anyway.

          ' Lab testing' filters only helps if you have something to compare against. A carefully researched element in micron perfect quality materials may look less impressive than one stuffed with little more than a toilet roll.

          Its easy to get paranoid and cynical with things like that. I know I did. Today I try to confine myself to looking for discrepancies and clues on adverts.
          And wondering why the same chinese 20 tonne bottle jack can cost anywhere between 29 and 110 on ebay depending on what brand name you have on the sticky label. Even if the 29 no name is a cheap clone of the 110 draper or sealy branded version (which I doubt) there is no guarantee the one for 110 is the genuine item.

          20 tonne should be enough for a corsa Actually I'm thinking of making a DIY log splitter.

          Read this morning that Jack Ma , the owner of the chinese internet giant Alibaba is on good terms with the Trump administration, who claim he has little effect of the US economy. Maybe not.
          Relatively few US made goods are worth faking. And quality makers,music copyright holders etc seem to charge US consumers noticeably less than they do in Europe.

          Maybe if they stopped ripping us off in Europe quite as much there would be less incentive for the pirates.

          Comment


          • #35
            OK gentlemen. This Sunday morning's car D.I.Y. session was certainly a revelation, or three. It was spark plug [replacement] and ignition coil pack [health-check] day. Anyway, I opened the passenger door to flip the bonnet catch...

            Firstly, Walksall your hypothesis seems to be correct, unfortunately. Ewwww!!! That pong is back with a damned vengence! Yes, I can now officially confirm that the mildew pong still exists. So, it can't be the pollen filter. There has to be fungus in the system. Yes, of course I'll arrange to clean it with an air-con spray cleaner, of the type you mentioned, sometime VERY soon. Cheers for the tip!

            So, I'm taking out the old spark plugs (whatever they were, I don't care) and replacing them with new ones. The ignition coil pack was jammed-in very, very, tight. I broke one of the plastic lugs trying to ease it out, it was that tightly secured. I managed to remove it eventually, it just needed a LOT of care, encouragement, and persuasion.

            Corsa D Mk3 1.4i 16v ignition coil pack [Bosch 221503472]

            It's a BOSCH! and look at the date. Obviously an OEM product. This ignition coil pack is in tip-top excellent condition (apart from the, now, broken plastic lug - oops!) and looks relatively brand new! All the contacts are clean and shiney and the rubbers are pristine! That was somewhat of a relief because I had imagined, due to the state of the other replaceable components on the car, that the ignition coil pack would be pretty much shot too. I'm surprised that it's Bosch branded though. I thought GM used ignition coil packs made by Delphi . Anyway, not forgetting the car is 10 years old and perhaps Bosch was the choice of the day back then.

            The spark plugs that were installed were a set of Bosch FQR8LEU2. These would certainly not be my choice of spark plugs to install in any vehicle. However, they didn't look in too bad condition to say that they'd been in the car for 10 YEARS and done +64,000 MILES!

            Click image for larger version  Name:	oldsparxcloseup.JPG Views:	0 Size:	174.2 KB ID:	122576

            Notice the "GM" logo on the plugs. These spark plugs have been in the car since it was new, I'm guessing. They came out easy enough and the insides of the spark plug tubes were so shiney they were like mirrors. From the evidence, I may have misjudged Bosch spark plugs entirely. If a set of Bosch FQR8LEU2 copper/nickel spark plugs can run reliably for this length of time, and do this much mileage, then there is a lot of truth to the company's claims that "Bosch copper core spark plugs feature a heavy-duty nickel center electrode for longer lasting service life compared to standard copper plugs" [Bosch FQR8LEU2 website].

            What's being installed in their place? I chose NGK Iridium IX ZFR5FIX-11 spark plugs. For Bugman's peace of mind, I bought them from a very reputable auto-parts dealer who assured me they are very genuine, and as far as I can tell they are the real McCoy and genuine item. There's "NGK Spark Plug Company Ltd, Nagoya, Japan. Made in Japan/Fabrique au Japon/Сделано в японии" printed on the back of the box and there's no label covering, or half-covering, any of the text. These spark plugs look to be the highest quality.

            Click image for larger version  Name:	newoldsparx.JPG Views:	0 Size:	244.9 KB ID:	122577

            So they went in, with a small pea-sized dab of copper ease on the plug threads. Ignition coil pack fitted back into place. The Corsa fired up and roared to life with the new NGK iridium plugs installed. I'll be giving it a "Sunday morning/afternoon test run" on my way to ASDA and back.

            I can't believe this car is running as well as it has been, since I bought it, with all these OEM parts installed that have never been replaced since the car was new! Care and attention of this Corsa has certainly been neglected. That's something I intended to keep on top of when I first got the car, and am still involved in doing it.

            Bugman, these NGK spark plugs are the real thing. They are the bona fide genuine item from NGK. Really they are! These are not fakes. No seriously, I'm being serious when I seriously say that I seriously believe these NGK Iridium IX spark plugs are seriously the real and genuine item. Seriously.
            Last edited by Exaga; Today, 09:22 AM. Reason: typos

            Comment


            • #36
              Sorry guys. I didnt mean to give the impression everything out there are fakes. Those Bosch plugs have the nice healthy looking 'milk chocolate' colour ,but looks like the electrode gap has eroded a bit over time ,so replacement is a good idea. I have never really thought of coil packs being a routine consumable item but I have never owned a car with a coil pack. Maybe they are
              . I think GM use more than one oem supplier depending on whats the most readily available/cheapest at the time.

              Check out the recent post by Tahmid under the exterior and interior threads regarding a mouldy musty smell from his aircon. Its another of my typical 'war and peace' length exchanges. Its not yet fully resolved, but there are similarities with your situation.

              Comment


              • #37
                Glad that you now have GENUINE - (are you quite sure?) NGK plugs

                If you look at the bolt holes in the coil pack, you will find that they are threaded - I have made up a strip of 1"x 1" angle iron with two (correctly spaced) holes in, this can be screwed onto the coil pack, forming a 'handle' to pull it out by.
                There is no earthly reason why a coil pack shouldn't last for the life of the car, but like any other component, can suffer premature death.
                I buy spark plugs from my local Vauxhall dealer, so they too have GM on them.
                I do have a reason for using genuine Vauxhall spark plugs (but don't let this put you off the NGKs)
                Spark plug manufacturers sell there product in a specific Heat Range, each heat range being intended to cover various engine manufacturers requirements, but due to this, have to be something of a compromise to cover a wide range of engines.
                Plugs branded with a car makers logo are made to the specific heat range required by THAT engine, so may well not be suited to another makers engine.
                Be assured that there is absolutely nothing wrong with your choice of plugs, I am quite sure that they will give you good service.
                Looking at the pictures of the 'business end' of your old plugs, the cars fuelling is spot on. I find it difficult to believe that they are the original plugs, as not only do the spark gaps become wider in use, but the centre electrode tends to become rounded, where yours still look quite 'square'.

                A thought about your pong.
                The Corsa 'C' had a problem that I thought had been overcome by the time that your model came out, but it still might be worth checking.
                The 'C' used to suffer from a rain water leak that entered the car via the perished seal around the brake servo, resulting in water collecting under the carpets, so it MIGHT just be worth checking that the carpet on the drivers side is not wet through.

                (Water also used to get into the passenger side on the 'C', via the BCM, ( box of electrical goodies) but by the time that the 'D' came out, this design had been modified.)

                Regards

                Comment


                • #38
                  Originally posted by Bugman View Post
                  Sorry guys. I didnt mean to give the impression everything out there are fakes. Those Bosch plugs have the nice healthy looking 'milk chocolate' colour ,but looks like the electrode gap has eroded a bit over time ,so replacement is a good idea. I have never really thought of coil packs being a routine consumable item but I have never owned a car with a coil pack. Maybe they are
                  . I think GM use more than one oem supplier depending on whats the most readily available/cheapest at the time.

                  Check out the recent post by Tahmid under the exterior and interior threads regarding a mouldy musty smell from his aircon. Its another of my typical 'war and peace' length exchanges. Its not yet fully resolved, but there are similarities with your situation.
                  Without joking around Bugman, regarding 'fakes', you certainly have a valid point and one which is worth remembering everytime one makes a purchase. Especially from online suppliers like eBay and Alibaba. Had you not apprised us of the "Any Logo You Like" oil filters from Thailand, I would never have questioned whether fake spark plugs might exist, when they obviously DO exist. Who knows? I may have ended up purchasing some fake branded junk myself! All the ribbing about fake items is only intended as, jovial, friendly fun because you seem to be quite an affable fellow. What you really deserve is a great big "THANK YOU!" As a consequence, I will certainly be more cautious and aware in future. I was somewhat inquisitive (verging on borderline-paranioa) with the auto-parts dealer before handing over any cash for the NGK Iridium plugs.

                  Beyond a shadow of doubt, these Bosch plugs that were installed have surprised me. If they are not the original plugs from when my Corsa was new, then a previous owner has replaced them with OEM plugs, for sure. I'm owner no.3 according to the log book. Surely, copper core/electrode spark plugs that have done +64,000 miles would be in a far worse state than these in the pic I showed you? Even if they are "copper core with a heavy-duty nickel center electrode" which are designed to last longer than conventional spark plugs.

                  I will certainly check out that post by Tahmid. Thanks again.


                  Originally posted by walksall View Post
                  Glad that you now have GENUINE - (are you quite sure?) NGK plugs

                  If you look at the bolt holes in the coil pack, you will find that they are threaded - I have made up a strip of 1"x 1" angle iron with two (correctly spaced) holes in, this can be screwed onto the coil pack, forming a 'handle' to pull it out by.

                  There is no earthly reason why a coil pack shouldn't last for the life of the car, but like any other component, can suffer premature death.

                  I buy spark plugs from my local Vauxhall dealer, so they too have GM on them.
                  Be assured that there is absolutely nothing wrong with your choice of plugs, I am quite sure that they will give you good service.
                  Looking at the pictures of the 'business end' of your old plugs, the cars fuelling is spot on. I find it difficult to believe that they are the original plugs, as not only do the spark gaps become wider in use, but the centre electrode tends to become rounded, where yours still look quite 'square'.

                  A thought about your pong.
                  The Corsa 'C' had a problem that I thought had been overcome by the time that your model came out, but it still might be worth checking.
                  The 'C' used to suffer from a rain water leak that entered the car via the perished seal around the brake servo, resulting in water collecting under the carpets, so it MIGHT just be worth checking that the carpet on the drivers side is not wet through.

                  (Water also used to get into the passenger side on the 'C', via the BCM, ( box of electrical goodies) but by the time that the 'D' came out, this design had been modified.)
                  Your homemade D.I.Y. 'handle' for the ignition coil pack is inspired! I noticed the 10mm screw holes in the top of the coil pack where the 8mm torx-drive bolts fit through to secure it in place. Had I planned for the coil pack initially not being easy to remove, something similar might be what I would have resorted to (given that I could have sourced a suitable piece of material for a handle and some lengthy M10 bolts). However, having considered making such a tool, and also having considered that if these NGK Iridium spark plugs don't need replacing again until their life expectancy arrives, I'd probably only ever need to use the tool once and once only, as I possibly won't be keeping the car long enough to do that kind of mileage. Time will tell in that respect.

                  Apparently, taking note from Google search results, YouTube videos, and other related websites, coil pack problems are a common fault with the Corsa Mk3. Which is where I got all my information on how to check over the ignition coil pack and the specific potential problems to look out for. I thought it would be the prime opportunity to do so as I was replacing the spark plugs anyway. The 6-connector pins, the internal spark plug (sprung) connectors, and the spark plug rubber plugs, are all in top condition on the existing ignition coil pack.

                  With respect Walksall, you're absolutely right about buying OEM spark plugs from authorised Vauxhall dealers, but I don't agree entirely. Vauxhall dealers have a vested interest in keeping themselves in business. They will sell you rubber windscreen wiper blades that last 12 months, if you're lucky, before they need replacing, when you could buy silicone wiper blades that last 4-5 times as long under (like-for-like) normal everyday use. The dealers don't tell you this, nor will they supply you with such wiper blades. You'll just go back next year and spend on a brand new set. Likewise, they'll sell you spark plugs that are designed for your car's engine, which were most likely decided on before Vauxhall actually produced the first engine, and (again) you'll be back in a few thousand miles to buy a new set to replace the ones that aren't as durable as, say, platinum or iridium spark plugs. There is, however, a lot to be said for only using the spark plugs that were specifically designed to run in your engine, from official Vauxhall dealers, for the reason(s) you have specified, as you obviously do yourself. I'm into saving money and getting the most value for money. If the NGK Iridium spark plugs I've installed are reliable and are trouble-free throughout their lifetime, without popping a gasket or causing my engine's internals to make a bid for freedom, I will have made an astute decision. If not then I'll be the idiot who ignored better advice and should have stuck to OEM spark plugs from the Vauxhall dealer.

                  The condition of the old spark plugs is causing me some enmity. I dislike Bosch spark plugs and would never choose to use them, only out of desperation or lack of alternatives (and, even then, for as short a time as physically possible). I had Bosch spark plugs installed in a Punto which failed on three occasions and I only had the car for approx. 2.5 years. Never again! That goes for both Punto's and Bosch spark plugs.

                  I checked the footwells and the carpet is dry as a bone. Incidentally, and perhaps fortunately, it rained here, very heavily, last night. Ergo, if water was getting in, as you've suggested, then I'd expect it to still be soaking wet.

                  Thank you both, very much indeed, for all your input, advice, and sharing your experience(s). I find it very informative and educational. Make things a hell of a lot easier.

                  Great stuff!

                  [Sunday morning/afternoon test drive to ASDA and back results will follow... Fresh coffee much needed first!]

                  Comment


                  • #39
                    After replacing the 4x Bosch FQR8LEU2 copper/nickel spark plugs installed in my (2009) Corsa D Mk3 1.4i [Z14XEP] engine with NGK Iridium IX ZFR5FIX-11 spark plugs, there are some quite noticable changes in the way the car starts and drives. I drove 11-12 miles on a round trip, stopping for approx. 25 minutes in between. I thought this was more than adequate distance for a "test run", of sorts.

                    With the Bosch plugs installed, and have been since purchasing the vehicle, the Corsa engine would generally turn over approx. 3 times, before roaring to life. Then it would idle at approx. 950-980RPM. Sometimes it was 4 turns and I've known it to be 5 turns of the engine, once or twice, before starting up. This is what prompted me to install new spark plugs in the first place. As a result of replacing the existing [old] Bosch spark plugs with the [new] NGK Iridium plugs, the engine now starts almost instantly, within half a second of turning the key. The engine does approx. 1 turn (if that) before starting up. It then idles at around 800-820RPM, which is decidedly less RPM while idling than it used to be with the Bosch copper/nickel spark plugs installed.

                    The most noticable difference is while driving, and especially when pulling away from the lights and at junctions, etc. There's more zest in the engine. More va-va-voom. The Corsa now seems to have a bigger 'mojo' or 'je ne sais quois' than it did before. The Corsa has always been a little sluggish around town. Always giving myself that extra couple of seconds leeway at junctions, etc. I've resigned myself to the fact that my Corsa was never going to get me anywhere in a bloody hurry! I had a Ford Fiesta 1.2 previously and that was quicker to accelerate, even from 0-60MPH, than the Corsa 1.4i I have now!

                    Now the car feels much more responsive, quicker to accelerate, and seems that there's actually more [instant] power available from the engine than there was before. With the NGK Iridium plugs installed, from my experience, it's as if I've gone from driving a car that was lethargic and/or struggling with power to one that actually has the power expected of a 1.4i engine. Maybe it's the fact they there's brand new spark plugs installed. Maybe it's because they are iridium spark plugs. Whatever the reason(s), it's made a very noticeable, and welcome, difference to the performace of the Corsa.

                    Comment


                    • #40
                      walksall : I further inspected the condition of the core electrodes on the old Bosch spark plugs and 2 of them are very rounded, where one has decidedly worn down to a dome which now sits at an angle. The other 2 plugs are quite square-ish but have both lost the edges on the core electrode and subsequently have chamfers on them.

                      Bugman : Yes, I agree. These Bosch spark plugs are beyond their "best before date" and needed replacing. I was intending to replace them anyway, whatever was installed. Probably a good thing that I did too. The ground electrodes are very eroded on all of the plugs.

                      FYI - fake spark plugs video:
                      Last edited by Exaga; Today, 03:46 PM. Reason: corrected video URL

                      Comment


                      • #41
                        Glad to hear you have had such a good result.

                        Thanks for the kind words .I didnt mind the banter ,just didnt want folk getting unduly concerned. Most stuff is fine,you just have to be careful. Its certainly worth double checking if you are paying a premium price for a quality version of something when 'no name' versions are also available significantly cheaper.

                        I wouldnt go to a main stealers for stuff like wiper blades. But it does make sense for some parts where originality and specification is important. .That said GM use a different blade fitting system to most,and GM specific blades might not be much cheaper elsewhere. Economies of scale. I use universal blades that come with several adaptors. A bit fiddly but it works . I am currently using Bosch' aero eco ' universal . But I only chose Bosch because they were on half price promotion, otherwise I would have bought Valeo. (They were down to 3 odd each - same as the cheapo no names -Bulgarian price ) I think the 'eco' bit means its Bosch's budget type, rather than their twin blade system (10 in Bulgaria) I dont suppose they mind if you assume it means eco as in saving polar bears.

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