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What's the maximum size of battery that will fit a Corsa Mk3 1.4i Design(2009)?

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  • [Corsa D] What's the maximum size of battery that will fit a Corsa Mk3 1.4i Design(2009)?

    Hi folks

    I'm driving a Corsa D Mk3 14i 16v Design (2009) and find that I need to replace the battery. My question is; What's the maximum size of battery that will fit my Corsa? I've done some searching online for this information and couldn't located it. I've measured the size of the battery tray length and it's 282mm from inside lip to lip. I'm also interested to know if there will be any problem(s) using a 190mm height battery. Most of the information online seems to suggest a 175mm height battery but nothing is set in stone. There's nothing in the user manual about this.

    So, as I want to install the largest suitable battery possible, I'm looking at the Bosch S5 008 or a Duracell Advanced DA72. Both these these batteries have the same length and width dimensions [Length=278mm / Width=175mm] but the height is different. Bosch S5 008 = 190mm height / Duracell DA72 = 175mm height.

    Ideally if someone owns a Corsa D Mk3 1.4 and has successfully fitted a battery that's 278mm length and 190mm height then it would answer all my questions. Thanks for any advice or feedback you can offer on this matter.

    Cheers!

  • #2
    Hi , Welcome to the forum

    I have a 2010 Corsa Diesel ,which generally take larger batteries than petrol cars. It is fitted with a 'Solite' battery made by the sung woo battery co of Korea. Sounds impressive eh? But I have owned the car since it was 2 years old and as far as I know its the original equipment battery fitted by GM when the car was new. (Its opel badged and left hand drive|) And its still going strong , starting the car in minus 20c. Its not very well marked but I think its 600 amps. Well known brand names do not always guarantee you will be getting the best possible battery performance. And regardless of size or brand or physical size not all batteries are created equal. Some use different technology that may pack more punch for its size.

    As far as I can tell without removing it from the tray my battery is 200 mm high (excluding the battery terminals) so I dont see why a 190mm high battery will not fit under the bonnet. The only problem I can for see is if your battery leads are not long enough for the extra height. Mine reach but theres not much in reserve, and the leads fitted to the diesel engine (which is made by fiat) may be different to yours .
    My battery is 176 mm wide, but only about 255mm long. (But sits as far forward in the tray as it will go, with the negative terminal where under bonnet clearance is at its minimum. )

    Other factors to consider are that the terminal post configuration is correct and that the new battery has suitable lips at the bottom for clamping it in place.

    Do bear in mind that the extra capacity of a larger battery can still have limitations if the car charging system is below par, or if something on the car is causing parasitic battery drain when unattended. (things like faulty after market alarms, amplifiers that dont shut down, boot lights that dont go off etc. ) Some battery suppliers will carry out free checks.
    Last edited by Bugman; 19-04-2019, 01:29 PM.

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    • #3
      Another point worth remembering, particularly if you only make short journeys, is that a higher capacity battery may never become fully charged.
      When the battery is fully charged and you are using standard equipment in the car, the battery is virtually 'floating' in the system (neither being charged or discharging)
      If you go in for accessories which use vast amounts of current, there may be a reason for fitting a larger battery, but even then, it would probably be better to fit a larger alternator instead or as well.
      If the car is tending to flatten the battery during starting, or that there is a problem such as Bugman describes above, then in honesty, the problem itself needs sorting, rather than going down the road of extra battery capacity, which in any case, may well only postpone the start of the problem.

      Regards

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by Bugman View Post
        Hi , Welcome to the forum

        The only problem I can for see is if your battery leads are not long enough for the extra height. Mine reach but theres not much in reserve, and the leads fitted to the diesel engine (which is made by fiat) may be different to yours . My battery is 176 mm wide, but only about 255mm long. (But sits as far forward in the tray as it will go, with the negative terminal where under bonnet clearance is at its minimum. )

        Other factors to consider are that the terminal post configuration is correct and that the new battery has suitable lips at the bottom for clamping it in place.

        Do bear in mind that the extra capacity of a larger battery can still have limitations if the car charging system is below par, or if something on the car is causing parasitic battery drain when unattended. (things like faulty after market alarms, amplifiers that dont shut down, boot lights that dont go off etc. ) Some battery suppliers will carry out free checks.
        Thanks very much for this info and advice, Bugman. Nothing like the voice of experience to learn from. I didn't think about the length of the terminal cables and will take that into account. Mine's a petrol engine but I don't know if it's the same as your diesel with regards to the battery tray. I would assume a diesel engine needs a larger battery so it may be more accommodating in that respect.

        Comment


        • #5
          A left hand drive diesel may not be the exact compatibility match you were hoping for. I will try and upload some photos later so you can compare.

          If your tray is 282 mm Iong I think its probably the same size as mine. Unless they mount it deeper for more height but i doubt it.

          But the diesel engine may well have a more powerful alternator to better cope with keeping a larger battery charged, And as Walksall says, unless the battery receives a net gain of charge over a period of time even a larger capacity may run out eventually.

          The battery leads on the diesel may be different as they may need to connect to different relative locations on the engine.

          Incidentally diesels normally need bigger batteries to cope with a heavier load when cranking the engine rather than any great need for extra storage. On my diesel Yaris Toyota specify a larger battery for uk spec diesel cars that were assembled in Japan than they do for the same car assembled in France. I think the french built ones use the same sized battery as petrol cars.
          When the smaller Yaris battery did finally give up the ghost due to old age I did fit the bigger size, although I had to modify the securing bar. Cant say i have noticed any difference.
          Last edited by Bugman; 20-04-2019, 06:52 AM.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Bugman View Post
            I didnt take the battery out to get an exact measurement but I'd say the battery tray on the diesel is the same size as yours,
            OK great. You gave me some ideas. I went on eBay and did a search for "Corsa D battery tray" and found that it seems to be the same battery tray on all engine models petrol/diesel (including vans) . So, what you're saying about standardisation makes sense and seems to be the case here. Good info.

            I also ventured on to youtube and found this tutorial where an Exide EA722 battery was installed in a Corsa D diesel. This Exide EA722 battery has deminsions of L:278mm W:175mm H:175mm which is exactly the same size as the Duracell DA72 battery I'm looking at. As shown in the video, the Exide EA722 battery went in without any problems, although it filled the battery tray completely. So, that indicates there would be no problems installing any battery of the same dimensions. It's just a question of the negative battery terminal in my Corsa D 1.4 petrol engine car being long enough to accommodate such a battery. Perhaps standardisation has also been implemented on the negative battery terminal cable and they are the same length across the Corsa D range. Anyway, thanks to your advice, I have checked this and there's ample play in the negative battery terminal cable to accommodate a 278mm length x 175mm height battery.

            Cannot thank you enough for your advice and pointing me in the right direction. I have all the info I need and I am now 100% sure of the maximum dimensions I'm dealing with in locating a replacement car battery.

            [edit] Sure, I'm aware of the larger Ah batteries requiring a longer charge in order to keep them topped up. These are things I am going to take into consideration when choosing a new battery. I just needed to know the limits of what I'm dealing with so I don't buy a ridiculously oversized battery that's never going to fit and/or isn't suitable for my Corsa D.

            Cheers!
            Last edited by Exaga; 20-04-2019, 07:01 AM.

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            • #7
              Thanks. I actually did an extensive edit on my post and didnt notice you had already read it! I dont think it changes much . A bigger battery can be an advantage if it will fit and your wallet can stand it!

              As I've already taken the photos I will upload them anyway as it may help others.


              The floor level of the battery tray on my car is located about 300mm below the top of the bulkhead that runs across the car at the back of the engine bay (with soft rubber seal on top) If yours is the same there should be no problem.
              With my 200 mm high battery fitted the top of the battery (excluding the terminal post) at the front of the car is approximately 30mm higher than the level of the yellow cap on the washer filler neck. The top of the negative terminal post /lead is higher still - about level with a point about halfway down the edge of the headlight where it follows the line of the bonnet.
              The negative post must be quite close to the (insulated) bonnet when its shut.. But it fits, and a battery that is 25mm or 10mm less tall should be no problem
              Click image for larger version  Name:	DSCF4836.JPG Views:	0 Size:	146.5 KB ID:	122250Click image for larger version  Name:	DSCF4837.JPG Views:	0 Size:	72.4 KB ID:	122251

              Please excuse the dirty engine bay,
              Last edited by Bugman; 20-04-2019, 08:51 AM.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Bugman View Post
                A bigger battery can be an advantage if it will fit and your wallet can stand it!

                As I've already taken the photos I will upload them anyway as it may help others.
                Thanks for the pics. I should be paying you an hourly rate for all the effort you've gone to. It's very much appreciated.

                My problem is that I have no clue about the battery that's currently in my Corsa, which was in it when I bought the vehicle. It is unbranded. It has no information on it except for the positive and negative markings for the terminals. I've measured the dimensions of the battery and it's L:207mm W:175mm H:190mm which would indicate it's a type 012 / 077. If this assumption is correct then we're possibly dealing with a ~45Ah ~360CCA battery. I don't know how old this battery is but it looks like it's seen better days. This says to me, "It's cheaper than cheap and needs replacing with something a lot more reliable before it gives up the ghost!"

                When we're talking about bigger battery, that's what I'm deliberating over right now. I don't want something with enough power to weld your fingers together when putting your key into the ignition. That would just be overkill. So, I'm looking at various options, manufacturers, user-reviews, and (of course) comparative prices. I've set my base-limit on a battery that's capable of 50Ah/500CCA, which I believe to be more than adequate, and anything up to 72Ah/680-700CCA. The latter being just about the largest battery that can be installed, which we now know for sure, thanks to your input.

                The current leaderboard goes like this:
                1. Duracell DA60T [type 075] 12V 60Ah 540CCA [L:243 W:175 H:175] - 80
                2. Duracell DA62H [type 027] 12V 62Ah 550CCA [L:243 W:175 H:190] - 90
                3. Bosch S5 001 [type 063] 12V 52Ah 520CCA [L:207 W:175 H:175] - 70

                I'm reading only good and positive things about the Duracell Automotive range of batteries and that's why I'm interested in them. I've read quite a few bad reports about Bosch in recent years but considering the number of batteries they've sold it's par for the course. Duracell car batteries have been around for a decade or so and if there were going to be any long-term flaws or nightmares with them I'm sure we would have known about it by now. I don't deal with Varta or Exide batteries due to past experience(s) I'd rather not recollect.

                Comment


                • #9
                  I.m not really up to speed on the best brands but I take an interest in who owns who in the automotive world.

                  Its strange you mention Exide and Varta. From just a minute or two googling i learned that at least some Bosch branded batteries are made in the Varta factory and are to all intents and purposes identical. And Exide (an Indian company) make no secret that they market some of their batteries in the USA under the Bosch name . . Actually Varta have recently been bought by Energiser so its anybodies guess who will now be making Bosch branded batteries. More from Exide maybe. Duracell at least earned their reputation as battery manufacturers.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    For a one-off fee of only 1.00, you can access all of the test data from Which? who test just about everything - The problem with taking full Which? membership, is that the item that you are interested in may not have had an up-to-date test, so it could be that some other make has overtaken them as what they list as their 'Best Buy', but for 1.00 it is a good investment.

                    As you say Bugman, you just don't know who owns what these days - even if you manage to find out, chances are that they are taken over by someone else else by the time you get round to quoting the information.

                    Regards

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      I hear that. Same as East Penn Manufacturing (a.k.a. East Penn Manufacturing – The world's largest single site, family-owned lead-acid battery manufacturer) have an exclusive deal with Duracell to supply their car batteries.

                      Thanks for the heads-up on Which?. I have seen that website before and never bothered with it.

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                      • #12
                        So I was even wrong about Duracell !. But one would hope they chose their supplier wisely when their own reputation is on the line.

                        Some of these smaller makers are great, but only the automotive trade know who they are. And of course the batteries may be made to duracells design and specification saving them having find expert staff and build a new factory somewhere the locals wont object to lead and acid. . Problem is you dont know, It might just be corporate bean counters wishing to maximise the income from the Duracell brand name by doing a deal on rebranding existing East Penn designs. I suppose you will find a similar story with many brands if you dig deep enough.

                        (Duracell are owned by a holding company that is is supposedly the third largest privately listed company in the world or some such -but this and 'worlds largest single site ,family owned etc.' are nonsense . I'm the worlds largest family owned seller of car parts who sells on ebay just from my my house .Even though I've only sold a few odds and ends that I no longer needed. )


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                        • #13
                          The link is www.dekabatteries.com - i don't know why it resolved it to "world's largest .. blah"

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                          • #14
                            I love this kind of stuff. How advertisers manipulate words. (sorry to those members who find it boring and irrelevant ) 'operating the largest single site lead battery ,manufacturing facility in the world' might sound like they are the worlds largest lead battery factory. All it really means is ' all those bigger makers who have bigger factories also have other factories because in reality they are much bigger than we are') ' A bit like saying 'the worlds biggest battery maker who still operate from a garden shed'.
                            But to be fair their 'garden shed' looks impressive and I'd quite happily buy a battery made there.

                            But Duracell car batteries sold in UK are not necessarily made in Pennsylvania. Bosh have batteries made by Varta in Germany, and Exide (made who knows where) for the USA

                            Ultimately user reviews (taken with a pinch of salt) are the better guide. And do you want to pay a premium for a battery that might last 7 years if you only expect to keep the car for 2 - 3 years ?
                            Last edited by Bugman; 21-04-2019, 04:42 PM.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Bugman View Post
                              Ultimately user reviews (taken with a pinch of salt) are the better guide. And do you want to pay a premium for a battery that might last 7 years if you only expect to keep the car for 2 - 3 years ?
                              Yes. I have taken a lot of reviews into account. Apparently if I was a Harley Davidson biker I'd be ecstatic about Deka batteries.

                              I'd pay for a premium battery that might last 7 years if i was only keeping the car for 2-3 years. Then at least I'd have more confidence that the battery would be reliable during that period.

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