Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Touch-up paint for Corsa alloy wheels

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Touch-up paint for Corsa alloy wheels

    I'm trying to find a matching silver touch up paint for my Corsa D 2010 factory fitted alloy wheels which have a few scratches from kerbing, can anyone suggest a good matching touch up paint?

  • #2
    I have read elsewhere that Vauxhall "Star silver" is a reasonable match. But even this comes in 4 different variants. Halfords have spray cans for vauxhall star silver 11 and star silver 111 .Are you after spray paint or a touch in pen to fill scratches.?

    Getting a decent colour match and invisible blending on metallic paint can be difficult even for a professional . In fact they probably wouldnt even try. Easier to completely respray all the wheels with the same colour. Colour can vary depending on the aging of the original, and even the direction of spraying can affect how the metallic particles are laid down and reflect light. If a clearcoat is also used this may darken the colour.

    If you ask nicely Halfords ,etc, may let you take 3 or 4 likely looking silver variants out to the car to compare. Assuming the paint sample on the paint cap is accurate. (The alternative of taking a wheel into the shop might work, but in-store lighting will be different. to daylight )

    Or you could try going to a specialised auto paint factors, There will probably be one somewhere near you, but it may be tucked away in an industrial estate . They may be able to match the colour electronically from the actual wheel in the same way you can take any item into a diy store and get paint mixed to match. Indeed they may not guarantee a good match unless it is measured, since paint mixed just from manufacturers code sometimes needs to be adjusted for aging paint etc , and so might ready mixed paint from the likes of halfords.

    Some factors may even be able to make up a colour matched rattle can . (but many now seem to only offer rattle cans from a limited range of standard 'stock' colours Youd probably get just as good match buying a silver wheel paint. with the added advantage these come in larger cans, usually enough for 4 - 5 wheels. ).

    Let us know how you get on.

    Comment


    • #3
      Thanks for your comments, there's certainly plenty to think about.
      I am just looking for a small brush applied touch up paint to fill and cover over a number of surface scratches on all four wheels without having to paint spray them.

      Regards

      Comment


      • #4
        Touch up pen kits kits usually come with a separate clear laquer pen and can get quite expensive ,especially if its wasted because the colour is wrong ! .

        Some e bay sites, such as this one, give the option of just buying the colour. This may be all you need for touching up wheels. Touch up paint is usually a thicker viscosity than spray paint, and might be enough to 'fill' small scratches if applied carefully and blended in. (Beware, paint tends to sink into depressions as it dries out) .But kerbing scuffs may be too deep to hide with paint, (and clear coat ) alone.

        You could always add clear laquer later if necessary. I keep a spray can of clear coat laquer in the garage.Over time you will find many other uses for it. You can spray a bit into the can cap, and before it dries, use it with a cheapo artists brush for touching up.

        Touch Up Pen Vauxhall Opel 2AU Star Silver III Chip Repair Scratch Bottle | eBay

        Its at your own risk. I cant guarantee star silver lll is a perfect match.

        Comment


        • #5
          I'm adding more, to highlight some of the pitfalls to bear in mind that may help Gobbiner and others.

          In the past I have tried touching in kerbing scuffs by using a brush and silver paint in the hope it looks less noticeable. Even with a good colour match they still stood out like a sore thumb. A rule of thumb with scratches,sanding swirls etc is if you can feel it using the edge of your thumb nail it will probably still show after painting. Paint can often highight defects, rather than hide them.

          I had a few minutes to spare, , a scuffed Toyota wheel, and already had a can of generic wheel silver spray paint, so i did a quick bodge job(at the roadside in Bulgaria,) to illustrate the problem.

          BEFORE Will paint disguise these dark scuff marks? - Click image for larger version  Name:	IMG_20210629_135955_654.jpg Views:	0 Size:	127.6 KB ID:	126445

          AFTER I had touched in the scuffs using a paintbrush .This was by the spray into the cap method, so the paint was quite thin.

          Click image for larger version  Name:	IMG_20210629_140956_465.jpg Views:	0 Size:	155.9 KB ID:	126446

          The colour match appears quite good, but if anything the marks look worse.

          For a decent job the scuffs would need to be filled. Either with a suitable body filler, or a fine surface cellulose putty filler. And then rubbed down to blend in invisibly with the surrounding paintwork You are then in the realm of having to respray the area . If you try to respray just a localised area , it may not blend very well with the rest of the wheel.

          Note also the different colour tones of the manufacturers original paint. Before it appears lighter to the left of the scratches , and after it appears lighter to the right. I only touched in the scuffs. The rest is toyota original. Its all caused by a slight shift in how the sunlight is reflecting off the metallic paint. This is why professionals will, if possible, spray whole panels, or wheels, rather than try to blend in paintwork to match mid panel or wheel.

          I'm not saying it might not be possible to do a better job using a paintbrush with more time and care. After all vintage Rolls Royces were painted using paint brushes for many years after spray painting was the industry norm. It just takes many hours of very skilled flattening down to remove brush marks . Maybe a thicker bodied paint will fill to some extent. But a thick coat of paint could take many hours, or even days, to dry out completely before you could think of rubbing down, or adding the next coat. And to blend it down to match the surrounding paint would need to be done very carefully , using VERY fine wet and dry paper, or blending pastes. Overdo the sanding, or use too coarse an abrasive and the job will be ruined, with the only recourse being to respray the whole wheel anyway.


          Next day, I started to remove the excess paint, and with the light different again found the colour match wasnt that good after all
          Click image for larger version  Name:	IMG_20210629_140956_465.jpg Views:	0 Size:	155.9 KB ID:	126447
          Attached Files

          Comment

          Working...
          X